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First Light on our new exhibit!

Installing the Lake Winnipeg Shared Solutions simulator table in the Science Gallery.

Installing the Lake Winnipeg Shared Solutions simulator table in the Science Gallery. (©2014 The Manitoba Museum. All Rights Reserved.)

Day Two of the Lake Winnipeg: Shared Solutions simulator installation, and we have first light from the projection system! The simulator comprises a table with eight individual touch-screens, surrounding a large projected image covering the table. In regular mode, visitors can take control of their own version of the Lake at each station, without being affected by what other visitors do. Big shared events like floods and storms will show up on the central projection, and affect everyone at the same time.

We can also run the experience for a group, where all eight stations are playing in the same Lake. All of their choices will feed into a central lake, and the effects will be displayed using the central projection screen. The “score” is depicted using a green algal bloom. The bigger the algal blob, the worse the health of the Lake. 

"First Light" no the simulator table - needs focus and alignment, but it works!

“First Light” on the simulator table – needs focus and alignment, but it works! (©2014 The Manitoba Museum. All Rights Reserved.)

 

This image shows the unfocused, rough, first image from the projector onto the table. The green blob is the algae. None of the touch screens are active yet, but when they are connected, they will form a seamless part of the image.

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Scott Young

Manager of Science Communications and Visitor Experiences

“Scott is the Planetarium Astronomer at the Manitoba Museum, developing astronomy and science programs. He has been an informal science educator for thirty years, working in the planetarium and science centre field both at The Manitoba Museum and also at the Alice G. Wallace Planetarium in Fitchburg, Massachusetts. Scott is an active amateur astronomer and a past-President of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada.”