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Amethyst Update

amethyst_exhibit_1

The amethyst exhibit in the foyer was installed today, on schedule. There were a few teething pains, mostly related to lighting, but when you have done many exhibits you know that you will never be finished without some sort of issue.

The last 5% of the installation work always takes 50% of the time. As a public space, the foyer has a lot of ambient light, which means that there is an immense amount of reflection on a plexiglas case lid. When we put the lid on, we realized that we would not be able to read some of the text. So the lid came off, the backing panel was offset a bit to the side, some flat black board was placed inside the back of the lid, and the lights were moved around and adjusted a couple of times more.

Voilà, the exhibit is done, and we are very pleased with the result. MANY thanks to David, Hanna, Janis, Cindi, Adèle, Bob, Bert, Paul, Sean, and everyone else for their efforts.  Even a simple exhibit such as this one requires the work of many people!

amethyst_exhibit_2

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Graham Young

Curator of Geology & Paleontology

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Graham Young grew up in Fredericton, New Brunswick. After doing a B.Sc. in biology at the University of New Brunswick, he switched to geology and did an M.Sc. in paleontology at the University of Toronto. After completing a Ph.D. at the University of New Brunswick in 1988, Graham spent two years in Newcastle, England, studying fossils from the Island of Gotland, Sweden. He moved to Winnipeg in 1990 to do research at the University of Manitoba, and has worked at the Manitoba Museum since 1993.

At the Museum, Graham’s curatorial work involves all aspects of geology and paleontology. He is responsible for building the collections, dealing with public inquiries, and preparing exhibits. Over the years, Graham’s research has become broader in scope, moving from specialist studies of fossil corals, towards research on ancient environments, ecosystems, and unusual fossils such as jellyfish and horseshoe crabs. Most of his current field research is on sites in the Grand Rapids Uplands and elsewhere in northern Manitoba.