Hours of Operation

Winter Hours

Thanksgiving (October 9)
11 am - 5 pm

Mondays
Closed (except Holidays)

Tuesday to Friday
10 am - 4 pm

Saturday & Sunday
11 am - 5 pm

Click for Holiday Hours

 

Tag Archives: museum

Spring has sprung

Once again I am studying pollinators at the Nature Conservancy’s Yellow Quill Prairie Preserve (http://www.natureconservancy.ca/en/where-we-work/manitoba/featured-projects/yellow_quill_prairie.html) just south of Canadian Forces Base Shilo. Last year I made the mistake of starting my field surveys too late and missed the blooming of a number of early flowering plants like prairie crocus (Anemone patens), three-flowered avens (Geum triflorum) and chickweed (Cerastium arvense). This year I did my first survey on May 11, which was already almost too late for the crocuses but just in time for the others. Spring is not the busiest time on the prairies as bee populations are not at their peak yet. However, it is a very important time…

Posted in Botany | Also tagged , , , , | Comments closed

Weird Tasks: Moving the Glyptodont

As we have worked our way through the pliosaur exhibit project, we have come up against a series of problems that have required novel solutions. About a month ago we carried out a very strange task, and one that none of us had ever had to do before: we needed to move the glyptodont. Before I explain how we did this, perhaps I had better backtrack a bit, as you probably have some questions at this point: “What is a glyptodont, anyway? Where did the Museum get its glyptodont and why did you need to move it?” Glyptodonts were creatures that lived during the Ice Age, that have been described as “fridge-size armadillos,”…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

Seeds of Days Past

Recently I became aware of a hundred year old collection of seeds located not in the Botany collection at the Museum but in the History collection. What were 100 years old seeds doing in the history lab? It turns out that they were donated in 1991 along with many other artefacts and specimens from the famous Criddle family (http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/pageant/06/criddlefamily.shtml) but not thoroughly catalogued. Questions about proper seed preservation recently came up and our History Cataloguer asked me about them, assuming that I knew this collection existed, which I didn’t. I looked closely at the five boxes of tiny vials of wildflower and weed seeds from Manitoba and was absolutely thrilled….

Posted in Botany | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

Left Behind in Airport Cove

If you think about how Museum paleontologists get fossils, you might guess that we go out and find where the fossils are, extract all of them from the rock and sediment, and return them to the Museum. Certainly that is what we do where fossils are scarce, but in many instances our job really consists of deciding what to leave behind. Our specialists at the Manitoba Museum are called curators, and a curator by definition has to be able to select what is needed for collections and exhibits. This fact was really brought home to me in the past couple of weeks, as we revisited sites in Airport Cove, the…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments closed

The Fossils Surround Us

Those of us who live in Winnipeg know that fossils are never far away. Many Winnipeg structures feature surfaces clad in Tyndall Stone, a fossil-rich dolomitic limestone of Late Ordovician age (about 450 million years old). Tyndall Stone covers public buildings such as the Manitoba Legislative Building and the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and commercial buildings in the downtown core, but it can also be seen in thousands of homes in Winnipeg: in walls, steps, and fireplaces. Thus, it is hardly surprising that the Museum and the adjacent Centennial Concert Hall both use Tyndall Stone inside and out. Of course Tyndall Stone fossils are represented in our Earth History Gallery, but if…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , , , | Comments closed

Inspiring Daphne Odjig mural back to its original glory

When people ask me what inspired me to work in the museum field, I can pinpoint my answer to a single visit to The Manitoba Museum when I was twelve years old. That summer we spent our vacation touring around Manitoba on day trips, packed into our Pontiac 6000 station wagon, visiting small local museums and landmarks that set one little town apart from the next (here’s looking at you, Sara the Camel!). On the roster of things to see was The Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature (as it was called back then). Thanks to my babysitting job, I was armed with a newly purchased camera and ready to…

Posted in Collections & Conservation | Tagged | Comments closed

The Old Plesiosaur and the Sea: The Collectors

In my last blog post, introducing our plesiosaur exhibit,  I promised to follow up with some of the story of how the collectors found, extracted, and prepared the fossils. When I was assembling the exhibit I interviewed Kevin Conlin and Wayne Buckley, since they tell these stories so much better than I ever could. Here are the interviews, which are also on the panels within the exhibit.   Kevin Conlin Kevin Conlin is a ceramic artist in western Manitoba who has worked with various museums, collecting and participating in scientific research. He collects fossils under permits from the Manitoba Historic Resources Branch, and has collected significant specimens now in the collections…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , , , , | Comments closed

Sea of Monsters

The Old Plesiosaur and the Sea Exhibit, Open November 14th-April 6th Tomorrow morning we will be opening our new Discovery Room exhibit, The Old Plesiosaur and the Sea. Some Discovery Room exhibits show exciting or previously unseen objects from the Museum’s collections, while others feature collaborations with the community. This exhibit will do both: some of the beautiful specimens have been donated over the past few years by two remarkable fossil collectors, but many of the other specimens are being loaned by those collectors, just for this exhibit. The collectors, Wayne Buckley and Kevin Conlin, spend much of their spare time collecting and preparing fossils from Cretaceous rocks in the Manitoba…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , , | Comments closed

Isn’t it iconic? Don’t you think?

    What are the Factors that Make an Exhibit “Iconic”? In the last little while we have been working on the plan for a new exhibit in the Museum’s Earth History Gallery, which will be focused on a large specimen that we recently added to the collections. Around here we like to refer to the specimen and the planned exhibit as “iconic.” But what does iconic really mean? And what makes an object or exhibit iconic? It seems to be the case that words that were once relatively obscure can become popular, and have their time in the media spotlight before once again slipping into comfortable obscurity (see my…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , | Comments closed

We Have Guests

Michael Cuggy (L) and Dave Rudkin discussing specimen notes. Those of you who are familiar only with the exhibits and the other “front end” parts of the Museum might be surprised at the constant changes that take place in the hidden parts of the institution. You might think that the dusty backrooms would remain the same from decade to decade, but really it is a whirl: exhibits are built in the workshop and moved out onto the floor, new plant and animal replicas and models are made by the artists, and specimens and artefacts are constantly cycled through the labs and storerooms of the Museum tower. This state of change is true…

Posted in Geology & Paleontology | Also tagged , , | Comments closed