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Was there a Suffragist in your family?

The Manitoba Museum is currently working on an exhibit that will open in November 2015. “Nice Women Don’t Want the Vote”, named after a statement by former Manitoba Premier Sir Rodmond Roblin, commemorates the 100th anniversary of the right to vote for women in the province in 2016.

 

Felt pennant, circa 1910-1916. Black and yellow were the colours of the Suffragist movement in North America. Donated by Warren West. H9-38-198. Copyright The Manitoba Museum.

Felt pennant, circa 1910-1916. Black and yellow were the colours of the Suffragist movement in North America. Donated by Warren West. H9-38-198. Copyright The Manitoba Museum.

We are looking for artefacts! Social and political movements don't leave many objects behind. Things like banners, flags, and pamphlets are often lost or thrown away after a movement succeeds (or fades). But we’re not just looking for political statements. Everyday objects that are in some way connected to the Suffragist movement, like a dress or pen or shoes, would be just as welcome. For example, we will be featuring French Limoges porcelain painted by Mae Irene Whyte, who marched with Nellie McClung to the Manitoba Legislature to obtain voting rights for women.

Jar, 1912-1919, painted by Mae Irene Whyte, Winnipeg. Whyte participated in the Suffragist movement. Donated by Marion E. Kaffka. H9-9-534. Copyright The Manitoba Museum.

French Limoges jar, 1912-1919, painted by Mae Irene Whyte, Winnipeg. Whyte participated in the Suffragist movement. Donated by Marion E. Kaffka. H9-9-534. Copyright The Manitoba Museum.

We are interested in loans, but may consider donations as well.

Likewise, if you have an interesting story about a Suffragist in your family history, let us know!

You can contact the Curator of History at rsawatzky@manitobamuseum.ca.

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Roland Sawatzky

Curator of History

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Roland Sawatzky joined The Manitoba Museum in 2011. Roland received his B.A. in Anthropology from the University of Winnipeg, M.A. in Anthropology from the University of South Carolina, and Ph.D. in Archaeology from Simon Fraser University (2005). Roland conducts research, is responsible for acquisitions, and develops exhibits related to the settlement period in Manitoba, including the development of Winnipeg. His research interests include the social meaning of material culture, 19th Century settlement in Manitoba, life in the home and historical archaeology.