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Hours of Operation

.

All Attractions
+ Ultimate Dinosaurs
Open daily
11 am – 5 pm

 

See Planetarium show
schedule, here.

 

We look forward to seeing you!


FACE MASKS ARE REQUIRED
at the Manitoba Museum.

This policy will be in place
until June 30.


Click for Holiday Hours
Hours of operation vary for different holidays.

 

Current Night Sky

Manitoba Skies – June 2022

 

June is the month with the fewest hours of darkness, with the summer solstice marking the first day of summer, astronomically speaking. For Manitoba, it doesn’t get fully dark even in the middle of the night, and in northern Manitoba this provides a state of all-night twilight. Still, there are many celestial sights to be seen, especially for early risers.

Solar System

Planetary Alignment: Yes, it’s true – the planets are “aligning” this month. It’s not a big deal, to be honest. The planets are all gathered in the morning sky right now, stretched out in a jagged line that stretches across half the sky. Under those criteria, the planets are always aligned to some degree. Other than meaning skywatchers have to get up early to see any planets at all, there is no effect. No gravitational issues, no omens, nothing. Be alert for conspiracy theorists and doomsayers to latch onto this “event” as proof of whatever idea or product they’re selling online.

The Sun is becoming quite active, although it’s not something most people can safely observe – you need expensive specialized filters to avoid permanent eye damage. You can follow the activity on sites like SpaceWeather.com, which provide safe views of sunspots and solar flares. Increasing solar activity also increases your chances of seeing aurora borealis or northern lights, so the page includes a forecast for those as well.

Mercury is too close to the Sun in the morning sky this month to be easily visible. Careful observes might spot it late in the month, low in the east-northeast just before sunrise. The thin crescent moon is nearby on the morning of June 27.

Venus is visible low in the southeast in the dawn sky. It rises about 4 a.m. local time at the beginning of June, and about 3:30 a.m. local time by month’s end. Despite remaining low in the sky, Venus’ brightness makes it a relatively easy target for morning stargazers.

Mars begins the month near Jupiter, rising about 3 a.m. local time. Throughout the month it separates from Jupiter and remains in roughly the same area of the sky, rising about 2 a.m. by month’s end. Still on the far side of its orbit, Mars will appear very small in a telescope in June.

Jupiter begins the month near Mars, but quickly separates and rises higher in the morning sky. By month’s end Jupiter rises about 1 a.m. local time and stands 30 degrees above the southeastern horizon at dawn – high enough to start getting decent telescopic views.

Saturn moves to nearly become an evening planet in June – but just barely. Rising at 2 a.m. on June 1st, it rises a few minutes before midnight on June 30th. Throughout June it does begin to get high enough before morning twilight for decent telescopic views.

Uranus is between Mars and Venus in the pre-dawn sky, but is only visible with binoculars or a telescope. Even then, the combination of distance and the bright twilight won’t provide good views.

Neptune is near Jupiter in the sky this month, not easily observable due to distance and the bright sky. Wait a few months for a better view.

Observer’s Calendar – DRAFT IN PROGRESS

All times are given in Central Daylight Time (GMT-5), the local time for Manitoba. All sky views are created with Stellarium software (stellarium.org).

Thu 2 Jun 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Fri 3 Jun 2022 (5 p.m. CDT – 9 p.m. CDT): First Friday, which means we’ll have telescopes set up (weather permitting) from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. around the Planetarium plaza. Local members of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada – Winnipeg Centre will be on hand for safe solar viewing and close-up views of the crescent moon. Inside, the Planetarium, Science Gallery, and Museum have all sorts of free programming going on as well – check out this link for details.

Tue 7 Jun 2022: First Quarter Moon (9:48 a.m. CDT)

Thu 9 Jun 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Tue 14 Jun 2022: Full Moon (5:52 a.m. CDT). With the Moon at perigee, its closest point to Earth, only 11 hours later, this qualifies as a “Supermoon”.

Thu 16 Jun 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Sat 18 Jun 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is below Saturn in the morning sky.

Mon 20 Jun 2022: Last Quarter Moon (10:11 p.m. CDT)

Tue 21 Jun 2022: Summer Solstice occurs at 4:14 a.m. CDT, marking the astronomical beginning of summer. On this date the sun rises as far north of east and sets as far north of west as possible, giving us long summer days and short summer nights. Also this morning, the Moon is near Jupiter in the pre-dawn sky.

Wed 22 Jun 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is near Mars in the pre-dawn sky. Viewed from extreme southern latitudes, the moon will actually cover up, or occult, Mars about 1 p.m. this afternoon, but this won’t be visible from Manitoba.

Thu 23 Jun 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Sun 26 Jun 2022 (morning sky): The thin crescent moon is near Venus in the morning sky. Both are below the Pleiades star cluster, which might just be visible in twilight as well.

Mon 27 Jun 2022 (morning sky): The thin crescent moon is near Mercury, very low in the east-northeast sky just before dawn. Binoculars will likely be needed to spot the pair in the bright dawn twilight.

Tue 28 Jun 2022: New Moon (9:52 p.m. CDT)

Thu 30 Jun 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

To find out when the International Space Station passes over your location, visit Heavens Above and enter your location.

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