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Hours of Operation

.

All Attractions
+ Ultimate Dinosaurs
Open daily
11 am – 5 pm

 

See Planetarium show
schedule, here.

 

We look forward to seeing you!


Face masks are strongly recommended for all visitors
(age 5+) at the Manitoba Museum.


Click for Holiday Hours
Hours of operation vary for different holidays.

 

Current Night Sky

(For August content scroll down)

Manitoba Skies – July 2022

Four planets stretch across the morning sky in July. View shown at 4 a.m. local time. (Image created using stellarium.org)

Solar System

The Sun is becoming quite active, although it’s not something most people can safely observe – you need expensive specialized filters to avoid permanent eye damage. You can follow the activity on sites like SpaceWeather.com, which provide safe views of sunspots and solar flares. Increasing solar activity also increases your chances of seeing aurora borealis or northern lights, so the page includes a forecast for those as well.

Mercury is too close to the Sun to be visible.

Venus is visible low in the east-northeast in the dawn sky. It rises about 3:30 a.m. local time at the beginning of the month and about 4:00 a.m. local time by month’s end. Despite remaining low in the sky, Venus’ brightness makes it a relatively easy target for morning stargazers.

Mars begins the month near Jupiter, rising before 2 a.m. local time at the beginning of the month and not long after midnight by the end of July. Still on the far side of its orbit, Mars will appear very small and too low for good telescopic views this month.

Jupiter is coming into good visibility for those who rise early. It rises about 11 p.m. local time but is halfway up the sky in the south-southeast at 4 a.m. local time, high enough for clear telescopic views.

Saturn rises before 10 p.m. in the southeast, and hugs the southern horizon as the night progresses, never rising very high. This is the situation for the entire year, with Saturn in the direction of the solar system that has the poorest visibility for northern hemisphere observers. The planet will be higher in the sky the farther south you go, so we can expect to see some great images from observers around the world. Saturn reaches opposition on July 14 (see calendar entry below).

Uranus is low in the east at dawn, but is only visible in binoculars or a small telescope (and even then with difficulty) due to the brightness of twilight. By the last week of July it is in the same binocular field of view as Mars, making it easier to track down.

Neptune is between Jupiter and Saturn  in the sky this month, visible as a tiny dot in good binoculars or a telescope.

The dwarf planets are all too far away to be seen except in larger telescopes, except for Ceres, which is in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. This month, Ceres is on the far side of its orbit from Earth and too close to the Sun in our sky to be visible.

Observer’s Calendar

All times are given in local time for anywhere around the world at mid-northern latitudes, unless it’s an event which occurs at a specific moment – then the time is given in Central Daylight Time (GMT-5), the local time for Manitoba. All sky views are created with Stellarium software (stellarium.org).

The Moon and Mars as seen through typical household (7×50) binoculars on the morning of July 20-21, 2022. (Image created using stellarium.org)

Fri 1 Jul 2022 (5 p.m. CDT – 9 p.m. CDT): First Friday, which means the Planetarium, Science Gallery, and Museum will be open and free to the public from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. CDT. No telescope viewing this month due to the holiday, but live sky shows in the Planetarium will keep you up to date on what’s going on in the sky.

Thu 7 Jul 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. This week is a replay of some of our favorite [email protected] moments over the past year. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Wed 6 Jul 2022: First Quarter Moon

Wed 12 Jul 2022: Full Moon. With the Moon close to perigee, its closest point to Earth, this qualifies as a “Supermoon”.

Thu 14 Jul 2022: Saturn reaches opposition, the point in its orbit when it is opposite the sun and therefore visible all night. Around opposition a planet is also at its biggest and brightest for telescope viewers, but Saturn moves so slowly that the view won’t change much from day to day all month.

Thu 14 Jul 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Fri 15 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is below and to the left of Saturn in the southern morning sky.

Sat 16 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is to the left of and slightly below Saturn in the southern morning sky.

Sun 17 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is midway between Saturn (on the right)  and Jupiter (on the left, the brightest “star” you can see in that direction) in the southern morning sky.

Mon 18 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is to the right of and slightly below Jupiter in the southeast morning  sky.

Tue 19 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon is below and to the right of Jupiter in the southeast morning  sky. The two are close enough that they will both fit into the field of view of typical 7×50 binoculars.

Wed 20 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Last Quarter Moon is midway between Mars (on the left) and Jupiter (on the right and very bright) in the southeastern

Thu 21 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon and Mars will be close together in the southeastern morning sky, the closest moon-planet conjunction of the month. Both will fit within the field of view of a typical pair of binoculars. With the moon’s white surface to compare, Mars’ reddish colour should be easily visible.

Thu 21 Jul 2022 (7 p.m. CDT): Our weekly [email protected] show, live on the Museum’s Facebook page and YouTube channel. This month we’ll revisit some more of our favorite moments from the previous year. Details of past and upcoming shows can be found on the [email protected] main page here.

Fri 22 Jul 2022 (morning sky): The Moon and the planet Uranus will be close together in the sky, but Uranus will be visible only with difficulty in a pair of binoculars due to the brightness of the nearby Moon.

Mon 25 Jul 2022 (pre-dawn sky): The crescent Moon will stand above brilliant Venus in the morning sky. Venus will be low in the north-northeast, well below and to the left of the moon, so you’ll need a clear horizon in that direction. Start looking about 4 a.m.

Tue 26 Jul 2022 (pre-dawn sky): The thin crescent Moon will be above brilliant Venus in the morning sky, just above the north-northeast horizon.

Thu 28 Jul 2022: New Moon

Fri 29 Jul 2022 to Sat 30 Jul 2022: The annual South Delta Aquariids meteor shower peaks in the early morning hours of July 30th this year, unimpeded by moonlight. Even though this is an annal shower, the meteors are often faint and it’s not a busy shower; you’ll need to be in a dark rural location away from city lights to see them. Expect 10-15 meteors per hour in the time after midnight and before dawn. The annual Perseids meteor shower is also active at a low level, so you might see a few of them as well as it builds up to its peak in mid-August. The Aquariids will come from more south, and the Perseids from more north, although they can be seen anywhere in the sky.

To find out when the International Space Station and the Tianhe Space Station passes over your location, visit Heavens Above and enter your location.

 

Manitoba Skies – August 2022 – DRAFT NOT COMPLETE

Solar System

The Sun is becoming quite active, although it’s not something most people can safely observe – you need expensive specialized filters to avoid permanent eye damage. You can follow the activity on sites like SpaceWeather.com, which provide safe views of sunspots and solar flares. Increasing solar activity also increases your chances of seeing aurora borealis or northern lights, so the page includes a forecast for those as well.

Mercury is not visible easily from Manitoba this month, but the southern hemisphere has a good view of the tiny planet after sunset.

Venus rises about 4:30 a.m. and is low in the north-northeast as dawn brightens. It outshines everything else in the sky except the sun and the moon, and so it’s probably the last “star” you’ll see before the day breaks.

Mars rises after midnight at the beginning of the month, and by 11:30 p.m. at the end. It is near the Pleaides star cluster and the Hyades star cluster for most of the month in the morning sky. The Last Quarter Moon is just above Mars on the morning of August 18-19.

Jupiter rises after 11 p.m. at the start of the month and by 9:30 p.m. in late August, finally becoming easily visible in the evening. It is very bright, outshining everything else except Venus, the Moon, and the Sun. A pair of binoculars will show several tiny dots of light in a line beside Jupiter – these are its four largest moons. They change position from night to night as they orbit the planet.

Saturn reaches opposition on August 13, placing it opposite the Sun in our sky. This means that Saturn will rise as the sun set, and set as the sun rises. Best visibility for telescope views will be around 1:30 CDT local time, when it is close to due south and highest in the sky. The Full Moon is just below Saturn on the night of August 12-13.

Uranus begins August close to Mars in the sky, making it easier to track down in binoculars, but is a challenge to locate.

Neptune is between Jupiter and Saturn  in the sky this month, visible as a tiny star-like dot in good binoculars or a telescope.

The dwarf planets are all too far away to be seen without a large telescope except for Ceres, which is in the main asteroid belt. This month, Ceres is on the far side of its orbit from Earth and too close to the Sun in our sky to be visible.

Observer’s Calendar

Fri 5 Aug 2022: First Quarter Moon

Thu 11 Aug 2022: Full Moon

Sat 13 Aug 2022 (morning sky): Perseids meteor shower peak

Sat 13 Aug 2022: Saturn at opposition

Mon 15 Aug 2022 (morning sy): Moon near Jupiter

Monday 15 Aug 2022 (evening Sky): double shadow transit on Jupiter

Thu 18 Aug 2022: Last Quarter Moon

Fri 19 Aug 2022: Moon near Mars

Thu 25 Aug 2022 (morning sky): Waning crescent moon is above Venus in the pre-dawn sky.

Fri 26 Aug 2022 (morning sky): A *very* thin waning crescent moon is to Venus’ left in the pre-dawn sky.

Sat 27 Aug 2022: New Moon

To find out when the International Space Station and the Tianhe Space Station passes over your location, visit Heavens Above and enter your location.

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